Commit 2e6c8419 authored by Alice Brenon's avatar Alice Brenon
Browse files

Get rid of bulleted lists

parent c4580b37
......@@ -309,17 +309,15 @@ understand the inner workings of the XML-TEI schema.
### Information about the headword itself {-}
Once a block for an article is created, it may contain elements useful to
represent features such as
- its written and spoken forms: `<form/>`
- a group of grammatical information: `<gramGrp/>`, that may itself contain as
previously demonstrated `<case/>`, `<gen/>`, `<number/>` or `<pers/>` to
describe the form itself for instance, but also information about the
categories it belongs to like `<iType/>` for its inflection class in languages
with a declension system or `<pos/>` for its part-of-speech
- its etymology: `<etym/>`
- its variants if there is a different spelling in a variety of the language or
if it has changed through time: `<usg/>` (though it is not its only purpose)
represent various of its features. Its written and spoken forms are usually
encoded by `<form/>` elements. Grammatical information like the `<case/>`,
`<gen/>` (previously mentioned) or `<number/>` and `<pers/>` can be contained
within a `<gramGrp/>`, along with information about the categories it belongs to
like `<iType/>` for its inflection class in languages with a declension system
or `<pos/>` for its part-of-speech. The `<etym/>` element is made to hold the
etymology of an entry. In the case when there are alternative spellings in
varieties of the language or if the spelling has changed over time, `<usg/>`
can be used.
All these are examples and by no means an exhaustive list; the complete set
provides the encoder with a toolbox to describe all the information related to
......@@ -557,16 +555,16 @@ occur in the middle of each one of the inclusion paths that define the structure
required to encode encyclopedic discourse, we find 21 elements but none of them
stand out as an obvious good solution: all paths to include the `<p/>` element
from any *dictionaries* element either contains a `<figure/>` (which we have
previously encountered earlier when we were practising our graph approach to
search for inclusions between `<entry/>` and `<entryFree/>` and dismissed as not
useful in general), a `<stage/>` (reserved to stage direction in dramatic works)
or a `<state/>` (used to describe a temporary quality in a person or place),
again not even close to what we want. The paths to either `<head/>` or
`<title/>` are similarly disappointing. Again, changing `<entry/>` for
`<entryFree/>` returns the exact same candidates. If that is not a thorough
proof that none of these elements could fulfill our purpose, it is a fact than
no element in this module appears as an obvious good solution and a serious hint
to keep looking somewhere else.
encountered earlier when we were practising our graph approach to search for
inclusions between `<entry/>` and `<entryFree/>` and dismissed as not useful in
general), a `<stage/>` (reserved to stage direction in dramatic works) or a
`<state/>` (used to describe a temporary quality in a person or place), again
not even close to what we want. The paths to either `<head/>` or `<title/>` are
similarly disappointing. Again, changing `<entry/>` for `<entryFree/>` returns
the exact same candidates. If that is not a thorough proof that none of these
elements could fulfill our purpose, it is a fact than no element in this module
appears as an obvious good solution and a serious hint to keep looking somewhere
else.
#### Widening the search {-}
......@@ -574,23 +572,26 @@ We hence widen our search to include elements outside the *dictionaries* module
which could be used to encode our sections and subsections, under the same
constraint as before to try and find a composite solution that would remain
under the `<entry/>` element even if resorting to subcomponents outside of the
dedicated module. Only three elements are returned:
- `<figure/>`: not any more useful to represent the content of encyclopedic
discourse than as a helper to include paragraphs
- `<metamark/>`: a very useful device to transcribe the edition marks than may
appear on a particular primary source to alter the normal flow of the text and
suggest an alternative reading (deletion, insertion, reordering, this is about
a human editing the text from a given physical copy of it), again really of no
use for a part of an article describing the geology of Europe for instance.
- `<note/>`: the first element that might at least resemble what we are looking
for. It is meant to contain text, is about explaning something and seems
general enough (not specific to a given genre, or to the occurrence of a
particular object on the page). Unfortunately, its semantics still seems a bit
off compared to our need. The documentation describes it as an "additional
comment", and, moreover "out of the main textual stream" whereas the long
developments in article are the very matter that inhabits the columns of text
encyclopedias are made of.
dedicated module. Only three elements are returned: `<figure/>`, `<metamark/>`
and `<note/>`.
The first one as we have repeatedly underlined is meant for graphic information
and is not suitable for text content in general.
The purpose of `<metamark/>` is to transcribe the edition marks than may appear
on a particular primary source in order to alter the normal flow of the text and
suggest an alternative reading (deletion, insertion, reordering, this is about a
human editing the text from a given physical copy of it), but it is
unfortunately of no use to encode a section of an article.
The first element that might at least resemble what we are looking for is the
last one, `<note/>`. It is meant to contain text, is about explaning something
and seems general enough (not specific to a given genre, or to the occurrence of
a particular object on the page). Unfortunately, its semantics still seems a bit
off compared to our need. The documentation describes it as an "additional
comment" which appears "out of the main textual stream" whereas the long
developments in articles are the very matter of the text of encyclopedias, not
mere remarks in the margins or at the foot of pages.
## Encoding within the *core* module
......
......@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ General remarks
oNumber sections with one digit (1., 2., etc.), and subsections with two digits (1.1, 1.2, etc.). Do not use sub-sub sections (2.1.1, 2.1.2, etc.). Do not use sub-sub-sub sections (2.1.1.1, 2.1.1.2, etc.).
-Use bold face for sections and subsections. Do not indent.
oRevise section numbering to avoid empty sub-sections, such as 2.1.
-Do not use bulleted lists. Write a paragraph instead.
oDo not use bulleted lists. Write a paragraph instead.
-Use 1cm indentation for the first line in all paragraphs except the first line of the (sub)section.
-Revise the text. Avoid gaps and repetitions like “to future other scientific projects”.
......
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